CVS difference for arm/source/rt.mss

Differences between 1.7 and version 1.8
Log of other versions for file arm/source/rt.mss

--- arm/source/rt.mss	2000/04/25 04:14:24	1.7
+++ arm/source/rt.mss	2000/04/27 00:22:17	1.8
@@ -1,8 +1,8 @@
 @Comment{ $Source: e:\\cvsroot/ARM/Source/rt.mss,v $ }
-@comment{ $Revision: 1.7 $ $Date: 2000/04/25 04:14:24 $ $Author: Randy $ }
+@comment{ $Revision: 1.8 $ $Date: 2000/04/27 00:22:17 $ $Author: Randy $ }
 @Part(realtime, Root="ada.mss")
 @Modify(Appendix, Numbered <@A.>, Referenced <@A>)
-@SetPageHeadings{$Date: 2000/04/25 04:14:24 $}
+@SetPageHeadings{$Date: 2000/04/27 00:22:17 $}
 
 @LabeledNormativeAnnex{Real-Time Systems}
 
@@ -51,7 +51,7 @@
 
 @end{Metrics}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 
 The specification of the metrics makes a distinction between upper bounds
 and simple execution times.  Where something is just specified as ``the
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@
 implementation, or to evaluate the comparative utility of certain features
 of an implementation for a particular real-time application.
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Extend83}
 This Annex is new to Ada 9X.
@@ -261,7 +261,7 @@
 
 @end{ImplReq}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 
 The priority expression can include references to
 discriminants of the enclosing type.
@@ -280,7 +280,7 @@
 enclosing @nt{compilation_unit}.
 @end{Ramification}
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Extend83}
 
@@ -447,7 +447,7 @@
 
 @end{ImplPerm}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 
 Section 9 specifies under which circumstances a task
 becomes ready.
@@ -481,7 +481,7 @@
 under @RefSec{Task Priorities}, @RefSec{Priority Ceiling Locking}, and
 @RefSec{Dynamic Priorities}.
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @LabeledSubClause{The Standard Task Dispatching Policy}
 
@@ -602,7 +602,7 @@
 
 @end{ImplPerm}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 
 If the active priority of a running task is lowered due to loss of
 inherited priority (as it is on completion of a protected
@@ -620,7 +620,7 @@
 the task to move to the end of the queue for its active priority,
 regardless of whether the active priority of the task actually changes.
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @LabeledClause{Priority Ceiling Locking}
 
@@ -772,7 +772,7 @@
 
 @end{ImplAdvice}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 
 While a task executes in a protected action, it can be preempted
 only by tasks whose active priorities are higher than the
@@ -807,7 +807,7 @@
 only protected subprograms (excluding the case where a protected operation
 calls another protected operation on the same protected object).
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @LabeledClause{Entry Queuing Policies}
 
@@ -1150,7 +1150,7 @@
 @end{Itemize}
 @end{Metrics}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 
 Setting a task's base priority affects task dispatching.  First, it can
 change the task's active priority.  Second, under the standard
@@ -1192,7 +1192,7 @@
 the operation completes without being preempted by any of the
 affected tasks.
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @LabeledClause{Preemptive Abort}
 
@@ -1269,14 +1269,14 @@
 
 @end{ImplAdvice}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 
 Abortion does not change the active or base priority of the aborted task.
 
 Abortion cannot be more immediate than is allowed by the rules for
 deferral of abortion during finalization and in protected actions.
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @LabeledClause{Tasking Restrictions}
 
@@ -1411,9 +1411,9 @@
 restrictions to produce a more efficient implementation.
 @end{ImplAdvice}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 The above Storage_Checks can be suppressed with pragma Suppress.
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @LabeledClause{Monotonic Time}
 @begin{Intro}
@@ -1768,7 +1768,7 @@
 
 @end{ImplAdvice}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 
 The rules in this clause do not imply that the implementation can protect
 the user from operator or installation errors which could result in the
@@ -1778,7 +1778,7 @@
 Tick represents the granularity of Real_Time.Clock.
 There is no requirement that these be the same.
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @LabeledClause{Delay Accuracy}
 
@@ -1882,14 +1882,14 @@
 @end{Itemize}
 @end{Metrics}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 
 The execution time of a @nt{delay_statement} that does not cause the
 task to be blocked (e.g. ``@key[delay] 0.0;'' ) is of interest in situations
 where delays are used to achieve voluntary round-robin task dispatching among
 equal-priority tasks.
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{DiffWord83}
 
@@ -2072,7 +2072,7 @@
 
 @end{ImplPerm}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 
 It is a consequence of the priority rules that held tasks cannot be dispatched
 on any processor in a partition (unless they are inheriting
@@ -2111,7 +2111,7 @@
 
 @end{itemize}
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @LabeledClause{Other Optimizations and Determinism Rules}
 

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