CVS difference for arm/source/04a.mss

Differences between 1.7 and version 1.8
Log of other versions for file arm/source/04a.mss

--- arm/source/04a.mss	2000/04/25 04:14:22	1.7
+++ arm/source/04a.mss	2000/04/27 00:22:16	1.8
@@ -1,10 +1,10 @@
 @Part(04, Root="ada.mss")
 
-@SetPageHeadings{$Date: 2000/04/25 04:14:22 $}
+@SetPageHeadings{$Date: 2000/04/27 00:22:16 $}
 @LabeledSection{Names and Expressions}
 
 @Comment{$Source: e:\\cvsroot/ARM/Source/04a.mss,v $}
-@Comment{$Revision: 1.7 $}
+@Comment{$Revision: 1.8 $}
 
 @begin{Intro}
 @Redundant[The rules applicable to the different forms of @nt<name> and
@@ -315,7 +315,7 @@
 @end{Example}
 @end{Examples}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 @i(Notes on the examples:)
 Distinct notations are used for components of multidimensional arrays (such
 as  Board) and arrays of arrays (such as Page).  The components of an array
@@ -324,7 +324,7 @@
 is  a  function  call  returning  an  access  value  that   designates   a
 two-dimensional array.
 
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @LabeledSubClause{Slices}
 
@@ -379,7 +379,7 @@
 
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 A @nt<slice> is not permitted as the @nt<prefix> of an
 Access @nt<attribute_reference>,
 even if the components or the array as a whole are aliased.
@@ -398,7 +398,7 @@
 an array that has only one component;
 its type is the type of A.  On the other hand, A(N)  denotes  a
 component of the array A and has the corresponding component type.
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of slices:)
@@ -725,7 +725,7 @@
 @end{Ramification}
 @end{ImplPerm}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 Attributes are defined throughout this International Standard,
 and are summarized in
 @RefSecNum{Language-Defined Attributes}.
@@ -754,7 +754,7 @@
   it would be very difficult to take 'Access of an overloaded
   subprogram.
 @end(Reason)
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of attributes:)
@@ -932,14 +932,14 @@
 @end{Ramification}
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 Enumeration literals that are @nt<identifier>s rather than
 @nt<character_literal>s follow the normal rules for @nt<identifier>s
 when used in a @nt<name>
 (see @RefSecNum{Names} and @RefSecNum{Selected Components}).
 @nt<Character_literal>s used as @nt<selector_name>s follow the normal
 rules for expanded names (see @RefSecNum{Selected Components}).
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of literals:)
@@ -1332,13 +1332,13 @@
 
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 For a @nt<record_aggregate> with positional associations, expressions
 specifying discriminant
 values appear first since the @nt<known_discriminant_part>
 is given first in the declaration of the type; they have to
 be in the same order as in the @nt<known_discriminant_part>.
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Example of a record aggregate with positional associations:)
@@ -1491,7 +1491,7 @@
 @end{Ramification}
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 If all components of the value of the @nt<extension_aggregate>
 are determined by the @nt<ancestor_part>, then
 the @nt<record_component_association_list> is required to be
@@ -1503,7 +1503,7 @@
 the Initialize procedure of the ancestor type is called,
 unless the Initialize procedure is abstract
 (see @RefSecNum{User-Defined Assignment and Finalization}).
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i{Examples of extension aggregates (for types defined in @RefSecNum{Type Extensions}):}
@@ -1843,13 +1843,13 @@
 checks fail.
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 In an @nt<array_aggregate>, positional notation may only be used
 with two or more @nt<expression>s; a single @nt<expression>
 in parentheses is interpreted as a @nt<parenthesized_expression>.
 A @nt<named_array_aggregate>, such as (1 => X), may be used to specify
 an array with a single component.
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of array aggregates with positional associations:)
@@ -2244,11 +2244,11 @@
 @end{Discussion}
 @end{ImplPerm}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 The two operands of an expression of the form X op Y, where
 op is a binary operator, are evaluated in an arbitrary order,
 as for any @nt<function_call> (see @RefSecNum(Subprogram Calls)).
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of precedence:)
@@ -2363,7 +2363,7 @@
 
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 The conventional meaning of the logical operators is given by the
 following truth table:
 @begin(Display)
@@ -2376,7 +2376,7 @@
         False@\        True@\        False@\        True@\        True
         False@\        False@\        False@\        False@\        False
 @end(Display)
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of logical operators:)
@@ -2713,7 +2713,7 @@
 the corresponding membership test using @key(in).
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 No exception is ever raised by a membership test, by a predefined
 ordering operator,
 or by a predefined equality operator for an elementary type,
@@ -2726,7 +2726,7 @@
 of this type have matching components if and only if their
 discriminants are equal.  Two nonnull arrays have matching components
 if and only if the length of each dimension is the same for both.
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of expressions involving relational operators and
@@ -2867,7 +2867,7 @@
 @end{Ramification}
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 As for all predefined operators on modular types, the binary adding
 operators + and @en on modular types include a final
 reduction modulo the modulus if the result is outside
@@ -2881,7 +2881,7 @@
 Conversely, a check after subtraction to see if a "borrow" was
 performed can be followed by a conditional addition of the modulus.
 @end{ImplNote}
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of expressions involving binary adding operators:)
@@ -2940,12 +2940,12 @@
 @end(example)
 @end{StaticSem}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 For modular integer types, the unary adding operator @en, when
 given a nonzero operand, returns the result of subtracting
 the value of the operand from the modulus;
 for a zero operand, the result is zero.
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @LabeledSubClause{Multiplying Operators}
 
@@ -3110,7 +3110,7 @@
 True, division by zero raises Constraint_Error.]
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 For positive A and B, A/B is the quotient and A @key(rem) B is the remainder when
 A  is  divided  by  B.   The  following  relations are satisfied by the rem
 operator:
@@ -3144,7 +3144,7 @@
 14    -5   -2       4       -1       -14   -5     2      -4        -4
 @end{Example}
 @end{Bundle}
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of expressions involving multiplying operators:)
@@ -3296,14 +3296,14 @@
 final result in this case would generally be 0.0.)
 @end{ImplPerm}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 @IndexCheck{Range_Check}
 As implied by the specification given above
 for exponentiation of an integer type, a check is made that
 the exponent is not negative.
 @Defn2{Term=[Constraint_Error],Sec=(raised by failure of run-time check)}
 Constraint_Error is raised if this check fails.
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{DiffWord83}
 We now show the specification for "**" for integer types
@@ -3869,7 +3869,7 @@
 @end{Ramification}
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 @begin{Multiple}
 @RootDefn{implicit subtype conversion}
 In addition to explicit @nt<type_conversion>s,
@@ -3911,7 +3911,7 @@
 as the target to minimize confusion
 (a similar recommendation applies to renaming and
 generic formal @key(in out) objects).
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of numeric type conversion:)
@@ -4054,13 +4054,13 @@
 @end{Reason}
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 When a given context does not uniquely identify an expected type,
 a @nt<qualified_expression> can be used to do so.
 In particular, if an overloaded @nt<name> or
 @nt<aggregate> is passed to an overloaded subprogram, it
 might be necessary to qualify the operand to resolve its type.
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of disambiguating expressions using qualification:)
@@ -4213,7 +4213,7 @@
 Finally, an access value that designates the created object is returned.
 @end{RunTime}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 Allocators cannot create objects of an abstract type.
 See @RefSecNum{Abstract Types and Subprograms}.
 
@@ -4244,7 +4244,7 @@
   The user may exercise more control over storage management by
   associating a user-defined pool with an access type.
 @end{Discussion}
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i{Examples of allocators:}
@@ -4711,7 +4711,7 @@
 
 @end{ImplReq}
 
-@begin{NotesNotes}
+@begin{Notes}
 An expression can be static even if it occurs in a context where
 staticness is not required.
 @begin{Ramification}
@@ -4758,7 +4758,7 @@
   The implementation must take care to evaluate such literals properly.
 
 @end{ImplNote}
-@end{NotesNotes}
+@end{Notes}
 
 @begin{Examples}
 @i(Examples of static expressions:)

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