CVS difference for ais/ai-00156.txt

Differences between 1.7 and version 1.8
Log of other versions for file ais/ai-00156.txt

--- ais/ai-00156.txt	2000/07/13 04:31:29	1.7
+++ ais/ai-00156.txt	2000/08/01 05:39:34	1.8
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-!standard G.1.1    (55)                               00-06-19  AI95-00156/06
+!standard G.1.1    (55)                               00-07-31  AI95-00156/07
 !class binding interpretation 96-09-04
 !status Corrigendum 2000 99-05-27
 !status WG9 approved 98-06-12
@@ -48,16 +48,15 @@
 
 Here is a proof by example that the given method is incorrect:
 
-Assume that the method described in the standard is correct.  Let a
-complex number X=0+I.  Let an integer n=-1
+Assume that the method described in the standard is correct. Let a
+complex number X = 0+I. Let an integer n = -1. Then
 
-X**n=1/i=-i
+X**n = 1/i = -i
 
-argument(X)=pi/2 and n is negative.  So, according to G.1.1(55),
-argument(X**n)=(pi/2)/|-1|=pi/2
+argument(X) = pi/2 and n is negative.  So, according to G.1.1(55),
+argument(X**n) = (pi/2)/|-1| = pi/2,
+but argument(X**n) = argument(-i) = -pi/2
 
-but, argument(X**n)=argument(-i)=-pi/2
-
 Obviously, pi/2 is not equal to -pi/2 (even as an angle); i.e. a
 contradiction has been found.
 No zero-valued complex numbers were involved (they can mess things up).
@@ -70,7 +69,7 @@
 Implementations may obtain the result of exponentiation of a complex or
 pure-imaginary operand by repeated complex multiplication, with arbitrary
 association of the factors and with a possible final complex reciprocation
-(when the exponent is negative).  Implementations are also permitted to
+(when the exponent is negative). Implementations are also permitted to
 obtain the result of exponentiation of a complex operand, but not of a
 pure-imaginary operand, by converting the left operand to a polar
 representation; exponentiating the modulus by the given exponent; multiplying
@@ -89,7 +88,7 @@
 pure-imaginary operand, by converting the left operand to a polar
 representation, exponentiating the modulus by the given exponent,
 multiplying the argument by the given exponent, and reconverting to a
-Cartesian representation. Because of this implementation freedom, no
+cartesian representation. Because of this implementation freedom, no
 accuracy requirement is imposed on complex exponentiation (except for the
 prescribed results given above, which apply regardless of the
 implementation method chosen).

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