CVS difference for ais/ai-00156.txt

Differences between 1.4 and version 1.5
Log of other versions for file ais/ai-00156.txt

--- ais/ai-00156.txt	1999/08/31 22:53:55	1.4
+++ ais/ai-00156.txt	2000/04/14 01:45:08	1.5
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-!standard G.1.1    (55)                               99-08-31  AI95-00156/04
+!standard G.1.1    (55)                               00-04-11  AI95-00156/05
 !class binding interpretation 96-09-04
 !status Corrigendum 2000 99-05-27
 !status WG9 approved 98-06-12
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@
     exponentiation of a complex operand, but not of a pure-imaginary
     operand, by converting the left operand to a polar representation,
     exponentiating the modulus by the given exponent, multiplying the
-    argument by the given exponent, and reconverting to a cartesian
+    argument by the given exponent, and reconverting to a Cartesian
     representation.
 
 !question
@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@
 pure-imaginary operand, by converting the left operand to a polar
 representation, exponentiating the modulus by the given exponent,
 multiplying the argument by the given exponent, and reconverting to a
-cartesian representation. Because of this implementation freedom, no
+Cartesian representation. Because of this implementation freedom, no
 accuracy requirement is imposed on complex exponentiation (except for the
 prescribed results given above, which apply regardless of the
 implementation method chosen).
@@ -170,7 +170,7 @@
 complex operand, but not of a pure-imaginary operand, by converting the left
 operand to a polar representation, exponentiating the modulus by the given
 exponent, multiplying the argument by the given exponent, and reconverting to a
-cartesian representation."
+Cartesian representation."
 
 Ken Dritz
 
@@ -194,7 +194,7 @@
   > exponentiation of a complex operand, but not of a pure-imaginary
   > operand, by converting the left operand to a polar representation,
   > exponentiating the modulus by the given exponent, multiplying the
-  > argument by the given exponent, and reconverting to a cartesian
+  > argument by the given exponent, and reconverting to a Cartesian
   > representation."
 
    Looks good, just a couple nits:

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