CVS difference for ai05s/ai05-0243-1.txt

Differences between 1.8 and version 1.9
Log of other versions for file ai05s/ai05-0243-1.txt

--- ai05s/ai05-0243-1.txt	2011/04/12 00:07:24	1.8
+++ ai05s/ai05-0243-1.txt	2011/04/30 07:28:36	1.9
@@ -1419,3 +1419,59 @@
 well I don't see what classical greek has to do with this!
 
 ****************************************************************
+
+From: John Barnes
+Sent: Monday, April 11, 2011  5:42 AM
+
+>> One should  not write "On the other hand" without a previous "On the
+>> one hand".
+>
+> I cannot find any basis for this arbitrary grammatic rule, and my
+> preliminary search shows many violations of John's rule in recognized
+> works.
+
+It's not my rule. Fowler's Modern English Usage (3rd edition) says (when talking
+about On the contrary) By contrast, the phrase "On the other hand"  is usaully
+directly or implicitly paired with "on the one hand" to indicate two contrasted
+sides of a subject, circumstances, considerations,... etc
+
+>> In classical Greek one writes    men   ... de ...  that is
+>>
+>> men ...   de ...
+>
+> well I don't see what classical greek has to do with this!
+>
+
+It's just that classical Greek as I was taught recently is riddled with these
+two phrases (or rather English translations are). Greek has single words for
+both phrases and they are what I was trying to write by "men" and "de". They
+seem always to be used in pairs.
+
+See attached [The attachment is just this message with "men" and "de" replaced
+by some Greek characters - Editor.]
+
+****************************************************************
+
+From: Robert Dewar
+Sent: Monday, April 11, 2011  1:10 PM
+
+> It's not my rule. Fowler's Modern English Usage (3rd edition) says
+> (when talking about On the contrary) By contrast, the phrase "On the
+> other hand"  is usaully directly or implicitly paired with "on the one
+> hand" to indicate two contrasted sides of a subject, circumstances,
+> considerations,... etc
+
+Note the "implicitly paired" here, that's REALLY important, your rule ignores
+this and tries to insist on direct pairing. So you are NOT agreeing with Fowler
+here (I accept Fowler as the authority on most things :-))
+
+> It's just that classical Greek as I was taught recently is riddled
+> with these two phrases (or rather English translations are). Greek has
+> single words for both phrases and they are what I was trying to write
+> by "men" and "de". They seem always to be used in pairs.
+
+Yes, bully for the ancience Greeks and their interesting language (with which I
+am quite familiar), but still i ask, what on earth does this have to do with
+english? :-)
+
+****************************************************************

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